Controversy and Diagnosis: The new DSM

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The revised Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders is scheduled for publication and release. The new DSM has been plagued with controversy in the formulation of several diagnoses and several committee members have resigned in protest during the process of revising this “psychiatric disease bible”. Changes to the diagnoses of: depression; compulsive over-eating; hoarding; autism and bi-polar disease in children have been central to the arguments and concerns. Are we over-medicalizing certain problems like grief or eating too much? Are the restricted diagnostic criteria for autism going to prevent young people who need education and support services to participate in school, vocational and community living programs?

In my training we had the DSM II, a vastly smaller and less strictly defined manual for psychiatric diagnosis. We appreciated the greater specificity and more scientific approach of the subsequent editions, but now many of us are wondering how the latest edition will impact or who it will effect.

Click here to read the New York Times view of the revised DSM:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/11/health/a-compromise-on-defining-and-diagnosing-mental-disorders.html?src=me&ref=general

Tag lines: depression, bipolar disease, autism, compulsive over-eating, mental health treatment, DSM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Rolf Gainer Ph.D.

Dr. Rolf Gainer is the founder of the Neurologic Rehabilitation Institute at Brookhaven Hospital in Tulsa, Oklahoma as well as the Neurological Rehabilitation Institute of Ontario, in Toronto, Canada. Dr. Gainer is a psychologist with more than twenty-five years of experience in the treatment and rehabilitation of individuals with brain injuries and a dual diagnosis. Dr. Gainer has designed and operated innovative rehabilitation programs in the United States and Canada for individuals who have been regarded as difficult to serve. He is currently involved in conducting two outcome studies related to the long-term issues faced by individuals with brain injuries and a dual diagnosis. He has presented papers throughout the United States and Canada in many professional conferences and educational forums.
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