The Future of Mind Reading

Believe it or not, it looks like the ability to read minds is becoming a reality – for machines at least. Jeremey Manier reports in the Chicago Tribune that a research team has managed to decipher the brain’s code, deducing what an individual is looking at based solely on brain activity. The astonishing study was […]

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Closing a Few Doors has its Advantages

Dan Ariely suggests that keeping your options open may actually hinder you in the long run. For most, it is difficult to close doors, buying the camera with the extra bells and whistles for “just-in-case”, as well as investing time in relationships with individuals you no longer have anything in common with. In the M.I.T. […]

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Exercise May Increase Neuroplasticity

Most know that exercise an essential component in being mentally and physically healthy. Exercise increases stamina and strength and also releases endorphins that alter mood. New research is now showing that it may also (at least in mice) induce multiple interacting genes that enhance neuronal resilience. The study looked at exercise and how it impacts […]

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The Role of Music in Stroke Recovery

The Helsinki University Central Hospital recently conducted a study to determine the effects of music on recovery. The researchers recruited 60 patients, age 75 or younger in the acute recovery phase from a left or right hemisphere middle cerebral artery stroke. The individuals were then randomly assigned to one of three groups: a music group, […]

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Recovery in Action

Last week I visited South Dakota to meet with their Brain Injury Alliance President (Ron Hoops), as well as various Brain Injury Support group leaders, and the Department of Human Services. While everyone I met was wonderful and had a wealth of knowledge to share, one event in particular stands out as something that I […]

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Taste: A phenomena in our mouths or brains?

A study which assessed how people perceive the taste and value of wine was conducted using functional MRI. Twenty subjects rated the taste of Cabernet Sauvignon wines in six tasting trials. Each one was administered twice, once with a low price and once with a high price. The subjects understood the test to be related […]

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Learning Disabilities Linked to Progressive Aphasia

A recent study by Emily Rogalski, Ph.D., of Rush University Medical Center, and colleagues suggests that learning disabilities may be a precursor of later language loss in patients with primary progressive aphasia. Learning disorders were more common among such patients and their family members than among healthy controls or those with other dementias, they reported […]

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A Long Ago Brain Injury May Account for Today’s Problems

Researchers at the Brain Injury Research Center at the Mt. Sinai School of Medicine are identifying previously unrecognized brain injury as the cause of many psychiatric problems. Wayne Gordon, the Center's Director and his team have identified high rates of "hidden brain injury"in individuals with other psychiatric and or addictions problems. The CDC acknowledges 5.3 […]

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Brain Injury and Long-Term Memory

A recent article in the U.S. News states that brain injury may not erase long-term memory. There’s ongoing debate about whether long term memory is always dependent on the medial temporal lobe, which contains the memory-processing center called the hippocampus. A study conducted by at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, supports […]

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Insulin Therapy and the Injured Brain

An article published on medpage today, states that intensive insulin therapy in the ICU may starve critically injured brains and potentially lead to further damage. Mauro Oddo, M.D. of Columbia University shares that “brain energy crisis” was 23% more likely with each 1 mmol/L decrease in systemic glucose and 10% more likely with each 1 […]

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