About Rolf Gainer Ph.D.

Dr. Rolf Gainer is the founder of the Neurologic Rehabilitation Institute at Brookhaven Hospital in Tulsa, Oklahoma as well as the Neurological Rehabilitation Institute of Ontario, in Toronto, Canada. Dr. Gainer is a psychologist with more than twenty-five years of experience in the treatment and rehabilitation of individuals with brain injuries and a dual diagnosis. Dr. Gainer has designed and operated innovative rehabilitation programs in the United States and Canada for individuals who have been regarded as difficult to serve. He is currently involved in conducting two outcome studies related to the long-term issues faced by individuals with brain injuries and a dual diagnosis. He has presented papers throughout the United States and Canada in many professional conferences and educational forums.
Author Archive | Rolf Gainer Ph.D.
Grieving Without End

Grieving Without End

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As we think about brain injury it is important to consider that the injury not only affects the person, but those around them. The Loss of Self which the person experiences and the Ambiguous Loss felt by their loved ones are aspects of brain injury which need to be addressed during the rehabilitation process and, in many cases, long after rehabilitation is over.

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UFC Fighter Dies from Brain Injury in Boxing Match

UFC Fighter Dies from Brain Injury in Boxing Match

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Tim Hague, a 34-year old UFC fighter, died on Sunday, June 18, 2017 after sustaining a severe brain injury in a boxing match in Alberta. His death from brain injury brings the risks of boxing and UFC fighting into sharper focus.

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Listening for CTE: a preliminary study

Listening for CTE: a preliminary study

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Researchers at Arizona State University have conducted a study using language to indicate changes to brain caused by conditions like CTE (Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy). In this study, researchers found greater language changes in players as compared to the executives and coaches.

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Ray Ciancaglini “Keeps on Punching”

Ray Ciancaglini “Keeps on Punching”

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Ray Ciancaglini is a wonderful friend to us here at NeuroNotes. Ray is a tireless advocate for concussions awareness and prevention of The Second Impact Syndrome. A retired boxer living with the long-term effects of multiple concussions, Ray has made preventing other athletes from experiencing the problems associated with multiple concussions his Number 1 priority. […]

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With the NHL, “it’s deja` vu all over again”

With the NHL, “it’s deja` vu all over again”

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The NHL is embarking on a battle to disprove the connection between concussions and Chronic Trauma Encephalopathy or CTE.

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50 years of living with a TBI: Craig J. Phillips continues to help others

50 years of living with a TBI: Craig J. Phillips continues to help others

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When Craig J. Phillips was 10 he had a severe brain injury which has impacted his life. Craig went on to complete a Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling and operates Second Chance to Live which provides inspiration and help to people living with brain injury disabilities. Craig’s articles and videos are part of a tremendous […]

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Another Bull Riding Tragedy

Another Bull Riding Tragedy

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Ty Pozzobon, a four-time champion bull rider, took his life this past January after battling depression and anxiety which are believed to have come from his multiple concussions.

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Hitting a Wall at 30 MPH: Concussion sensors measure brain damage

Hitting a Wall at 30 MPH: Concussion sensors measure brain damage

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The G-Force data from mouth guard sensors can tell us about what happens to different structures of the brain during impact and the transmission of shock from the impact through the corpus callosum. The impact of a single hit is comparable to hitting a wall in a car at 30 miles per hour.

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Football Player’s “Silent Struggle” ends in suicide

Football Player’s “Silent Struggle” ends in suicide

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In December 2015, Zac Easter shot himself ending what he called his “Silent Struggle” from the effects of multiple concussions he sustained from football. A month earlier, Zac had planned to end his life either by his own hand or suicide-by-cop, but was stopped and hospitalized. The reality was that Zac had tired of watching himself deteriorate and he knew that the cause of his problems was CTE or Chronic Trauma Encephalopathy.

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healthline-blogs-of-2016

NeuroNotes Blog Attains National Recognition

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The Editors at NeuroNotes are proud to havebeen selected among the Best Traumatic Brain Injury Blogs of 2016. Maegan Jones of Healthline.org , who recognized NeuroNotes as one of the Best TBI Blogs of 2016, noted that the award was based on each blog’s ability to “…educate, inspire and empower their readers with frequent updates […]

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