About Rolf Gainer Ph.D.

Dr. Rolf Gainer is the founder of the Neurologic Rehabilitation Institute at Brookhaven Hospital in Tulsa, Oklahoma as well as the Neurological Rehabilitation Institute of Ontario, in Toronto, Canada. Dr. Gainer is a psychologist with more than twenty-five years of experience in the treatment and rehabilitation of individuals with brain injuries and a dual diagnosis. Dr. Gainer has designed and operated innovative rehabilitation programs in the United States and Canada for individuals who have been regarded as difficult to serve. He is currently involved in conducting two outcome studies related to the long-term issues faced by individuals with brain injuries and a dual diagnosis. He has presented papers throughout the United States and Canada in many professional conferences and educational forums.
Author Archive | Rolf Gainer Ph.D.
Boston Patriots Near Forgotten Heroes Live with CTE

Boston Patriots Near Forgotten Heroes Live with CTE

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The 1960’s and 1970’s football heroes are now old and aging. Some have passed away and a few have taken their own lives. Football in the 1960’s and 70’s allowed players to return to the game with concussions due to the lack of awareness of the long-term effects of multiple concussive injuries. It’s time that we take a look at these players and see how they’ve fared as they age.

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Can research develop early detection of CTE?

Can research develop early detection of CTE?

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Over 700 mixed martial arts fighters and boxers have enrolled in a study at the Cleveland Clinic’s Lou Revo Center for Brain Health in Las Vegas over the last six years. The study involves both active and retired fighters and is looking for the early signs of trauma-induced brain injury based on subtle changes in blood chemistry, brain imaging and performance testing.

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Youth Football can be the cause of brain dysfunction in later life

Youth Football can be the cause of brain dysfunction in later life

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The formative years in brain growth and development can be negatively affected by repetitive impacts to the brain. Football has been at the cross hairs of this problem due to it’s popularity and the early age at which football is introduced to children.

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“Bolloxed” says McGregor, Concussion likely per Referee

“Bolloxed” says McGregor, Concussion likely per Referee

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Conor McGregor called his wobbly legs and dazed look “bolloxed”, but Referee Robert Boyd identified McGregor as unable to continue the fight against Floyd Mayweather, Jr. due to what may have been the signs of concussion. A veteran ringside physician, Darragh O’Carroll, MD,  confirmed that the signs of concussion observed by the referee were consistent […]

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110 NFL Brains with CTE

110 NFL Brains with CTE

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The results of a study by Dr. Ann McKee into the brains of deceased NFL football players was published in The Journal of the American Medical Association. Dr. McKee studied the brains of 202 deceased football players of which 111 played in the NFL and 110 showed signs of CTE.

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Grieving Without End

Grieving Without End

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As we think about brain injury it is important to consider that the injury not only affects the person, but those around them. The Loss of Self which the person experiences and the Ambiguous Loss felt by their loved ones are aspects of brain injury which need to be addressed during the rehabilitation process and, in many cases, long after rehabilitation is over.

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UFC Fighter Dies from Brain Injury in Boxing Match

UFC Fighter Dies from Brain Injury in Boxing Match

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Tim Hague, a 34-year old UFC fighter, died on Sunday, June 18, 2017 after sustaining a severe brain injury in a boxing match in Alberta. His death from brain injury brings the risks of boxing and UFC fighting into sharper focus.

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Listening for CTE: a preliminary study

Listening for CTE: a preliminary study

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Researchers at Arizona State University have conducted a study using language to indicate changes to brain caused by conditions like CTE (Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy). In this study, researchers found greater language changes in players as compared to the executives and coaches.

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Ray Ciancaglini “Keeps on Punching”

Ray Ciancaglini “Keeps on Punching”

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Ray Ciancaglini is a wonderful friend to us here at NeuroNotes. Ray is a tireless advocate for concussions awareness and prevention of The Second Impact Syndrome. A retired boxer living with the long-term effects of multiple concussions, Ray has made preventing other athletes from experiencing the problems associated with multiple concussions his Number 1 priority. […]

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With the NHL, “it’s deja` vu all over again”

With the NHL, “it’s deja` vu all over again”

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The NHL is embarking on a battle to disprove the connection between concussions and Chronic Trauma Encephalopathy or CTE.

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