A parent’s guide to talking with your children about concussions

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If your child has ever fallen off their bike or gotten knocked over in a pickup game of football, you know that children don’t tend to hide their injuries. Quite the opposite. They cry and scream and let you know exactly where it hurts.

But, some injuries aren’t as easy to understand as a cut or a bruise – like concussions, for example. A child may be able to tell that they don’t feel right after they hit their head, but it can be hard for them to understand what is happening or explain it to their parents.

This is why it is important to talk to your children at a young age and explain the signs and symptoms of a concussion, as well as what to do when they may have one.

Of course, the intricacies and long-term risks of brain injuries are a tricky subject to explain to a five-year-old without scaring them. Thankfully, Dr. Robert Cantu, a renowned neurosurgery professor and codirector of the Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy at Boston University, has plenty of experience working with children and educating them about concussions.

Sheila Mulrooney Eldred from Good Sports spoke with Dr. Cantu to create an in-depth guide telling you how to approach your kids, what type of language to use, and when the best time to sit them down is. You can learn more by reading “How to Talk to Your Kids About Concussions (Without Scaring Them)”.

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